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SOFOBOMO 2010: Done

I’m done! Or I will be as soon as the PDF finishes uploading, anytime now . . . I think that took about three weeks (doing the whole project, not the upload time for the pdf, yet), and I’ve got more photos to show for it than I have had the last couple of years. I’m also happier with the results. Stumbling on an idea that had the right scope for this kind of project certainly helped.

See the book here: 47 Pictures of Unexplained Numbers

In other news, I was not overly pleased with the book I ordered from Blurb. I was prepared for the color shift, but the printing in general seemed to be fairly poor quality; too many artifacts, too few dots on the page, too much bad sharpening. They must do some post on the images after you upload them. Sigh. I’d have settled for crappier paper but better printing.

I’m at a bit of an impasse when it comes to printing. My Epson died shortly before we moved to DC, and I haven’t bothered to replace it. I don’t do enough printing to keep an inkjet printer happy. Perhaps I need one of the ones that regularly cleans itself, but those are mostly the larger models, and I just don’t do that much large printing. I tell myself that if I had a full darkroom that I’d take up wet printing again, but I’m not sure if that’s true. I wonder if I can rent darkroom time somewhere in DC. Might be fun to do from time to time. Or better, I’d like to just rent time on a workstation and printer that were all setup to go. Video editors can rent a suite with a beefy computer, fun sound junk, calibrated monitors, decks and all that ludicrously expensive software. Why can’t a photographer rent time in a photo printing suite? Or can you? Anybody know?

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82F

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, HP5, XTOL 1+1, 82F, 6 minutes

I’ve finished up shooting for SOFOBOMO 2010. I’ve still got a bit of post processing to do (and redo -see the middle of the set on flickr), but I’ve got a pretty good idea of what I’ve got to work with. See the last post for a link to the set.

In other news, it’s going to break 100F today. When I developed a roll of HP5 yesterday, the developer came out at 82F even after being cut with ice water. HP5 has longer development times than TMY2, but it was still a brief 6 minutes in the soup. I should write post one day about developing in the heat, something I first learned to do in South Korea, and something I’m having to relearn in DC as we don’t have central AC.